La Casa Encendida

bandeau

General overview

La Casa Encendida (The Incandescent House) showcases a charity institution’s transformation into a vibrant cultural centre for shaping society—its temporary art displays working to shape attitudes, counter stereotyping and address human rights. Opened in 2002 in an early twentieth century former pawnshop, this dynamic activist space was to empower marginalised groups to spread socially purposeful narratives.

To test this vision’s endurance, the study followed the subsequent staging of Mundo Extreme (Extreme World) in 2013-14. The exhibition aimed to reveal the hidden creative world of artists with intellectual disabilities in the wider visual-arts arena.

Principal access interventions :

  1. The imposing main stair, a later addition, was replaced with an open reception area at street level to welcome passers-by directly into the heart of the complex (fig. 6).
  2. A new main stair and lift were introduced without compromising the original heritage building’s structure.
  3. Neutral, artificially-lit exhibition spaces anticipated temporary displays permitting rapid responses to evolving social issues (fig. 14).
  4. Site-specific art interventions in common areas reach new audiences by making art part of daily life when they drop in to use other resources (figs. 8 and 9).
  5. A range of workshops, studios and resources facilitate local communities’ participation in cultural production (fig. 5, Sections).
  6. The roof terrace was converted into an informal open-air space for public enjoyment (fig. 5, Sections).

Location :

La Casa is situated in Lavapies, a relatively modest and multicultural barrio commencing at the southern tip of Madrid’s prestigious ‘Art Promenade’ (fig. 1). The latter forms a cultural axis through the city’s wealthier northern districts and is the address of many major museums such as the Prado, the Reina Sofía, the Thyssen and others. The project’s marginal siting just outside this cultural core was considered favourable for embracing Madrid’s southern disadvantaged communities and exerting a dynamic influence upon these areas.

Description :

Formerly the pawnshop of Monte de Piedad de Madrid, Spain’s oldest savings bank known for facilitating social credit since 1702, today La Casa is a contemporary cultural centre known for social action. Philosophically it stands at the edge of traditional ideas about what a museum is and does. Nonetheless, it holds lessons for museums seeking to enhance their social agency.

Find out more :

Background

This case study is one of a three part series exploring inclusive design responses to a common dilemma in heritage museum buildings:

How to bring stories to life in museums’ heritage spaces to engage today’s diverse audiences?

The study extends inclusive design thinking to embrace three nuanced interpretations of social inclusion drawn from the museum world. The case studies of three venerable cultural institutions’ efforts to reinvent themselves demonstrate these aspirations:

  • Showing Fair Representation at the Navigation Pavilion (new tab)
  • Sharing Dialogue at the Ashmolean Museum (new tab)
  • Shaping Society at La Casa Encendida (this case study)

Together they reveal an inclusive symbiosis between storytelling and design strategies. Simply put, storytelling held broad human appeal while designers made stories more comprehensible and meaningful for diverse audiences.

The research portrays the Museum as Storyteller, highlighting socially inclusive opportunities of rescripting museums’ heritage spaces as compelling vehicles for narrative to rival other popular storytelling media forms.

Author

Michelle Moore · School of Architecture · The University of Queensland

This case study is distilled from, and includes extracts of, Moore’s PhD thesis—The Museum as Storyteller: Designing socially inclusive narrative environments. Publication details of the thesis with bibliography will be available at the following link (new tab).

Challenges

Heritage significance and attractiveness

Coming into being in 1910 as Casa de Empeños (Pawn House), the original Casa was designed by architect Fernando Arbós in the Neo-Mudéjar style. This movement began in late nineteenth century Madrid, later spreading to other Spanish regions. It is a revival of Mudéjar architecture of the Spanish Reconquista, combining traditions of both cultures as Christian states expanded at the expense of Muslim states. In La Casa today, typical Neo-Mudéjar features are still in evidence, such as the corner turrets, abstract brick ornamentation and planning around an interior patio.

Access challenges

Approach

Project

A walk through La Casa transformed demonstrates equitable spatial production, occupation and exhibiting strategies aimed at creating an activist narrative environment for combatting wider societal prejudice and exclusion.

Fig. 6. La Casa Encendida: the Neo-mudejar façade, post-transformation, showing the new open reception area that connects the street to the central patio, welcoming passers-by directly into the heart of the complex.6
Fig. 6. La Casa Encendida: the Neo-mudejar façade, post-transformation, showing the new open reception area that connects the street to the central patio, welcoming passers-by directly into the heart of the complex.6

An understated intervention—to effect a deep ideological shift

Transforming Casa de Empeños to La Casa­­­­­­­­­ Encendida required a profound ideological shift on the client’s part—from dispensing charity to culturally empowering communities. By contrast, the architectural intervention was comparatively understated; it was respectful of the original heritage building’s decorative brick façade, austere interior details and structural and spatial distribution around a large central patio (fig. 6 and general view above).

Fig. 4. La Casa Encendida: ground floor plan of Casa de Empeños, pre-transformation (2001).13
Fig. 4. La Casa Encendida: ground floor plan of Casa de Empeños, pre-transformation (2001).13
Fig. 5. La Casa Encendida: floor plans and sections for transformation (2002).5
Fig. 5. La Casa Encendida: floor plans and sections for transformation (2002).5

Open step-free reception—welcoming passers-by to drop in

An imposing grand stair, a later addition that dominated the main entrance hall, was demolished and replaced with an open reception area that formed a step-free link between the street and internal patio (compare figs. 4 and 5, Ground Floor Plans). This strategy aimed at dismantling the physical or psychological impediments that prevented curious passers-by from entering by welcoming them directly into the heart of the complex (fig. 6 and general view above). Across the central patio, the removal of a vertical stack of small storerooms made the opening for the new main stairs and elevator without compromising the heritage listed structure (compare figs. 4 and 5, Ground Floor Plans).

Fig. 14. La Casa Encendida: view of one of the neutral “white box” exhibition spaces ready for installation of a temporary exhibition.14
Fig. 14. La Casa Encendida: view of one of the neutral “white box” exhibition spaces ready for installation of a temporary exhibition.14

Temporary exhibitions—responsive to changing social issues

Half a level up from reception, double-height spaces that formerly contained auction areas and storerooms were re-lined to seal external windows and create neutral, artificially-lit exhibition spaces (fig. 14). Such spatial ambiguity anticipated temporary displays that could quickly respond to evolving social issues.

Furthermore, management’s non-hierarchical spatial distribution of exhibition content sought to break down deeply entrenched art scene barriers and create dialogue across “high” and “low” culture or “famous” and “emerging” artists. Therefore, a well-established contemporary artist, or a modern art canon like Chagall or Kandinsky, was always exhibited concurrently with a lesser-known or emerging artist, where each was given equal exhibition space, time and resources.

Fig. 9. “100 metre bench” by El Ultimo Grito in La Casa Encendida’s central patio.9
Fig. 9. “100 metre bench” by El Ultimo Grito in La Casa Encendida’s central patio.9

Site-specific art in common areas—reaching new audiences

Management’s appropriation of common circulation areas as informal temporary exhibition spaces for experimental site-specific art aimed to offer emerging artists exhibition “practice”. The strategy simultaneously exposed non-exhibition-going audiences to art as part of everyday life when they dropped in to use other facilities such as the cafeteria, fair-trade shop or IT facilities (fig. 9).

Central patio—adaptable to diverse groups’ activities

Previously open to the elements, the four-story-high central patio was roofed over with a contemporary, streamlined canopy (fig. 5, Sections). This new element retained the beneficial natural lighting of the patio while shading the roof terrace with its deep eaves. The patio was initially conceived as a circulation hub; however, modifications since executed by the centre’s management, including adding acoustic wall panelling, shading louvers and artificial lighting tracks, now enables the staging of exhibitions, concerts and other events in this flexible space (general view above). Beneath, the patio was excavated to accommodate two more dedicated exhibition spaces, a sixty-seat cinema and a two hundred-seat auditorium complete with dressing rooms (fig. 5, Basement Floor Plan and Sections). The wide range of facilities permits intense events and activities programming by and for diverse groups.

Fig. 13. Visiting artist Pablo Genovés (left) with Debajo del Sombrero workshop participant José Manuel Egea (right) in La Casa Encendida.13
Fig. 13. Visiting artist Pablo Genovés (left) with Debajo del Sombrero workshop participant José Manuel Egea (right) in La Casa Encendida.13

Workshops—empowering users to create cultural content

On the upper levels, former bank staff residences were demolished and replaced with an array of workshops and resources for public use, including: art, radio and photography studios, IT facilities, classrooms and media libraries (figs. 5 and 13). These were crucial to realising the project team’s vision that conceived La Casa’s users not only as spectator audiences but also as active creators of cultural content.

Roof terrace—an open-air space for communities’ use

Visitors who continue ascending to the roof terrace find two small exhibition spaces within the building’s ornamental Neo-Mudéjar turrets (fig. 6). Between these turrets, the roof terrace offers a popular open-air space for sustainable garden projects, outdoor exhibitions and film screenings or relaxation under the shade of the patio canopy eaves from where Madrid’s roof-scape can be enjoyed (fig. 5, Sections).

Fig. 15. “Werewolf” by José Manuel Egea ready for exhibit in Mundo Extreme.15
Fig. 15. “Werewolf” by José Manuel Egea ready for exhibit in Mundo Extreme.15
Fig. 16. Alvaro Matxinbarrena’s model of the design concept for the exhibition Mundo Extreme held at La Casa Encendida.16
Fig. 16. Alvaro Matxinbarrena’s model of the design concept for the exhibition Mundo Extreme held at La Casa Encendida.16
Fig. 17. Drawings gallery of the exhibition Mundo Extreme. A central bench invited seated contemplation of works set in deep frames inspired by religious display techniques.17
Fig. 17. Drawings gallery of the exhibition Mundo Extreme. A central bench invited seated contemplation of works set in deep frames inspired by religious display techniques.17
Fig. 18. Sculpture gallery of the exhibition Mundo Extreme. The rows of identical, unglazed cabinets were an abstraction of traditional museum cabinets.18
Fig. 18. Sculpture gallery of the exhibition Mundo Extreme. The rows of identical, unglazed cabinets were an abstraction of traditional museum cabinets.18

Mundo Extreme—bridging the divide between well-known and ‘outsider artists’

La Casa’s staging of Mundo Extreme illustrated many of the above spatial production, occupation and exhibiting strategies in action. This temporary exhibition brought to light the narrative art of people often excluded, patronized or treated as inferior by society at large—adults with intellectual disabilities. It presented the results of a three-year collaboration between La Casa’s ‘Solidarity’ department and a Madrid-based ‘outsider art’ group: Debajo del Sombrero (Under the Hat—hereafter, Sombrero).

Much of the artworks displayed in Mundo Extreme convey a sense of how narrative art flowed out of the workshops like uninhibited “speech” from artists who in many cases had limited powers of speech in the usual sense (fig. 16).

Sombrero’s choice of sculptor Álvaro Matxinbarrena as exhibition designer was a step towards their mission to bridge the divide between well-known and lesser-known artists irrespective of their intellectual abilities.

Matxinbarrena chose to convey a socially purposeful message through a provocative mimicry of a traditional museum space and structures. The formal museum-like mounting strategy and grey colour palette aimed to transform La Casa’s “white box” galleries into dark, solemn spaces, challenging those unaccustomed to seeing intellectually disabled artists as serious contributors to culture (figs. 16, 17, 18).

Watch this inclusive space

If you liked this taster of The Museum as Storyteller, check back in early 2020 for more on La Casa Encendida’s project challenges, players and processes and the case study’s conclusions.

Players and processes

Players

Processes

Pictures and maps

Illustrations notes

GENERAL NOTE: The researcher has colour-rendered the drawings and added/deleted annotations on all images in order to highlight issues relevant to the research.

1  Research group “Drawing and Documentation of Architecture and City” (ETSAM-School of Architecture of Universidad Politéctica de Madrid), Madrid’s Art Promenade, 2011, map, in Javier Ortega Vidal, Ángel Martínez Díaz and María José Muñoz de Pablo, The Representation of the City between Plan and Volume: The Plan of Prado and the Scale Model of Gran Via (Valencia: Universitat Politècnica de València, 2012), 257, plate 1, accessed 21 August 2018, https://polipapers.upv.es/index.php/EGA/article/view/1447 .

2 Bie Peeters, [La Casa Encendida: the Neo-Mudéjar façade of Casa de Empeños, pre-transformation], 2002, black and white photograph, in Luis Enguita and Bie Peeters, De Casa de Empeños a La Casa Encendida (Madrid: Obra Social de Caja Madrid, 2002).

3 Bie Peeters, [La Casa Encendida: the central patio of Casa de Empeños, pre-transformation], 2002, black and white photograph, in Luis Enguita and Bie Peeters, De Casa de Empeños a La Casa Encendida (Madrid: Obra Social de Caja Madrid, 2002).

4 Carlos Manzano Arquitectos, [La Casa Encendida: Ground floor plan of Casa de Empeños, pre-transformation], 2001, technical drawing, provided for use in this research by Carlos Manzano Arquitectos 2 August 2013.

5 Carlos Manzano Arquitectos, [La Casa Encendida: floor plans and sections for transformation], 2001, technical drawing, provided for use in this research by Carlos Manzano Arquitectos 2 August 2013.

6 La Casa Encendida, [La Casa Encendida: the Neo-mudejar façade, post-transformation], n.d., color photograph, provided for use in this research by La Casa Encendida 10 October 2014.

7 M. Rodríguez, [La Casa Encendida: the central patio, post-transformation], n.d., color photograph, provided for use in this research by La Casa Encendida 10 October 2014.

8 M. Blanco, [“Hansel and Gretel’s Terrace” by Andres Jaque and Frederico Herrero in the exhibition En Casa 2013 in La Casa Encendida], 2013, color photograph, provided for use in this research by La Casa Encendida 10 October 2014.

9   La Casa Encendida, [“100 metre bench” by El Ultimo Grito in La Casa Encendida], 2007, color photograph, provided for use in this research by La Casa Encendida 27 March 2012.

10 Teresa Isasi, [Artist Andrés Fernández participating in Debajo de Sombrero’s drawing workshop while on excursion to a park near La Casa Encendida], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.

11 Teresa Isasi, [Sculptor Luis María Herrero at work on a piece destined for the exhibition Mundo Extreme during Debajo de Sombrero’s sculpture workshop], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.

12 Teresa Isasi, [Lola Barrera (right) founding director of Debajo de Sombrero, and multimedia artist Belén Sánchez (left) during Debajo de Sombrero’s sculpture workshop], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.

13 Teresa Isasi, [Visiting artist Pablo Genovés (left) with Debajo del Sombrero workshop participant José Manuel Egea (right) in La Casa Encendida], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.

14 Bie Peeters, [La Casa Encendida: view of one of the neutral “white box” exhibition spaces], 2002, black and white photograph, in Luis Enguita and Bie Peeters, De Casa de Empeños a La Casa Encendida (Madrid: Obra Social de Caja Madrid, 2002).

15 Teresa Isasi, [“Werewolf” by José Manuel Egea ready for exhibit in Mundo Extreme], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.

16 Alvaro Matxinbarrena, [Model of the design concept for the exhibition Mundo Extreme held at La Casa Encendida], 2013, exhibition design model, provided for use in this research by Alvaro Matxinbarrena 7 August 2013.

17 Teresa Isasi, [Drawings gallery of the exhibition Mundo Extreme in La Casa Encendida], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.

18 Teresa Isasi, [Sculpture gallery of the exhibition Mundo Extreme in La Casa Encendida], 2013, colour photograph, provided for use in this research by Debajo de Sombrero 10 October 2014.